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Holden On: Science and Why We Love It

Holden McGinnis, Science/Tech Editor

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Science. An endless frontier of new ideas, new thoughts, new inventions. Though at times it can be completely mysterious, what we do know about science is fascinating. Though I am clearly biased in saying so, science may just be the most interesting thing in the world. What other subject can explain the way the world works and why the sky is blue.

Science encompasses everything there is to know about anything, and in this sense, it is barely an exaggeration. Every motion we make can be explained by science. For example, this article would not be able to be written if not for my brain being able to signal to my hands which keys to type and when and the computer being able to process inputs from the keyboard.

Other subjects, though interesting, lack a similarly applicable aspect that science possesses. Though knowing vast amounts of history will help you become a more well-rounded and knowledgeable person, it will rarely have any practical application.

A superb knowledge of literature serves a similar purpose, though the writing skills garnered in that environment is key to success in any field. These are necessary parts of our education, yet ones that will never be quite as exciting, since they also lack the continual change that the field of science undergoes.

While we can say that history is always growing in length, which is true, these changes are little in comparison to some fields of science, which are completely revolutionized every few decades. A century ago, history classes were probably taught in a similar way to how they were now and covered similar material, except without the entire 20th century.

In earlier science classes, well lets say things were rather primitive. The information being taught has been proven wrong in some cases, such as previous atomic theories, and much of physics had yet to be fully discovered. Many of the experiments that we now conduct with ease in our classes were being conducted for the first time, just years before these classes, and were far from being standard enough to be taught in classes.

With such great research being conducted in our present day, there is a plethora of research opportunities available with advancements being made nearly every day in many fields. And those fields themselves are expanding, a few decades ago we wouldn’t have dreamed of the current generation of consumer electronics. Now we’re working on incredible nanotechnology, with applications in neuroscience and the consumer market.

This all brings us down to the one question we can not really answer: Why do we enjoy science? One could say its because in a way it is completely limitless. It begs for innovation, for development off of past ideas and the creation of brand new ones, for the need to make everything as small and powerful as possible, for the need to improve the world, one step at a time.

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The School Newspaper of Harriton High School
Holden On: Science and Why We Love It